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Stop the Internet Blacklist!

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S. 3804, the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA), introduced by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), would create a blacklist of domain names that the government thinks are involved in copyright infringement, which the Attorney General can then add to with a court order.

Internet service providers and others would be required to block any domains on the list.

This amounts to government censorship of the Internet. COICA is scheduled to be considered by the US Senate Judiciary Committee this Thursday, so there's no time to waste.

Please add your name to Demand Progress's petition at http://demandprogress.org/blacklist/, and contact your own Senator directly to let him or her know you oppose this bill and the rest of the War on Sharing.

For more information, see Peter Eckersley's analysis for the Electronic Frontier Foundation at https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/11/case-against-coica.

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"Censoring the Internet is

"Censoring the Internet is something we'd expect from China or Iran, not the U.S. Senate."- Naaah, why is that? I'm not surprised at all, to be honest.

Internet blacklist

The Australian case proves that the anti-counterfeit or anti-child-pornography or whatever the evil-fed-to-the-sheeple of the day argument is just an excuse to blacklist sites that the groups at the power don't like and/or fear people to read. In Australia opinion and religious sites ended up in the blacklist, and they were the most in number.

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