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Claudio Matsuoka: Frankensystem

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OS

Another post about the Lone Gunmen. Watching carefully the computer screen depicted in the last episode, it seemed to be a bit more ellaborated than your average HollywoodOS (which usually has a green 1200/75 terminal that beeps at each received character along with a spinning wireframe 3D model and a progress bar). The Gunmen OS (which I suspect is in fact MacOS 9 with Kaleidoscope) is a bit different:

1. It runs on a 800MHz Powerbook Titanium (but apparently also in PCs or PC-like hardware scattered through the episodes).
2. Window frames have 4dwm-style decoration but with four buttons in the upper right corner.
3. General UI appearance is somewhat reminescent of old Amiga Workbench gadgets and stuff.
4. A file is being downloaded to c:\archive\scope_op\ like in old DOS (or Windows).
5. There’s an editor with a chunk of AppleScript code, including:

Full Post with interesting pix.

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