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Google wants its very own Net

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Google

It seems Google is lusting for its own personal and private global internet,.

"Last month, Google placed job advertisements in America and the British national press for 'Strategic Negotiator candidates with experience in...identification, selection, and negotiation of dark fibre contracts both in metropolitan areas and over long distances as part of development of a global backbone network'," says the Times Online, going on:

"Dark fibre is the remnants of late 1990s internet boom where American web companies laid down fibre optic cables in preparation for high speed internet delivery. Following the downturn in the technology sector during the early 2000s, the installation process for many of these networks was left incomplete. This has resulted in a usable network of cables spread across the United States that have never been switched on. By purchasing the dark fibre, Google would in effect be able to acquire a ready made internet network that they could control."

The story says Google already owns a large telecom interconnection facility in New York and it's believed from there, "Google plans to link up and power the dark fibre system and turn it into a working internet network of its own.

Full Story.

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