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What Operating Systems are Developers Using?

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OS

A brief exchange on Twitter yesterday regarding developer operating system preferences seemed like an excellent opportunity to demonstrate how and where we’re trying to leverage data and RedMonk Analytics to provide quantitative insight on developer related questions.

Briefly, Ian Skerrett of Eclipse asserted that, according to Eclipse’s community survey data, Mac had fallen behind Linux as an operating system of choice for developers. Rolling up their numbers, I get the following distribution of operating systems:

rest here




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