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The secret plan behind the “3.0 (quilt)” Debian source package format

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Software

While I have spent countless hours working on the new source format known as “3.0 (quilt)”, I’ve just realized that I have never blogged about its features and the reasons that lead me to work on it. Let’s fix this.

Design goals for the new formats

When I started working on the new source package format, I set out to get rid of all the known limitations and to integrate a patch system in dpkg-source. I wanted to clear up the situation so that learning packaging only requires to learn one patch system and would not require modifying debian/rules to use it. I picked quilt because it was popular, came with a large set of features, and was not suffering from NIH syndrome. This lead to the “3.0 (quilt)” source format.

I also created “3.0 (native)” as a distinct format. “1.0″ was able to generate two types of source packages (native and non-native) but I did not want to continue with this mistake of mixing both in a single format. The KISS principle dictated that the user should pick the format of his choice, put it in debian/source/format and be done with it. Now the build can rightfully fail when the requirements are not met instead of doing something unexpected as a fallback.

Features of “3.0 (quilt)”




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