Two Vulnerabilities Provide Root Access on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

Two new vulnerabilities affecting Linux were uncovered this week that could potentially be used by malicious hackers to gain root privileges.

One vulnerability, which was reported on Tuesday by security firm VSR, arises from a flaw in the implementation of the Reliable Datagram Sockets protocol (RDS) in versions 2.6.30 through 2.6.36-rc8 of the Linux kernel.

Known as CVE-2010-3904, the bug could allow a local attacker to issue specially crafted socket function calls to write arbitrary values into kernel memory and thereby escalate privileges to root, giving the attacker "superuser," administrator status.

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Linux Kernel Update

pcworld.com: A new update to the Linux kernel adds a raft of security features, driver support, and other enhancements without increasing the overall size of the kernel at all.

That's a rarity, given that enhancements in each update have tended over the years to increase the kernel's size. This time around, though, there are a number of improvements that will be visible to users, but without any extra mass.

It won't be long before this new kernel is integrated into most popular Linux distributions. Here are some of the highlights of what users can expect.

Beefed Up Security

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