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From Noob to Ninja – Your Guide to Mastering Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Every Linux user has been new at some point, and unless you’ve got a history of UNIX administration, the transition was likely a bit daunting. Many people began learning Linux before sites like Google and StackExchange made it easy to find answers, and ended up having to figure everything out in their own. While inconvenient, this approach can force you to challenge yourself and learn things about the system that you might otherwise never find out.

Usually here at MakeTechEasier, we focus on specific topics for our tutorials. This time we’re taking a different approach, and providing a high-level overview of series of steps designed to hone the skills of a Linux beginner, and turn them into the kind of geek who compiles a new kernel for fun.

Step 1 – Install an “Easy” Linux in Real Partitions

There’s a good chance that if you’re reading this, you’ve likely already installed a Linux such as Ubuntu or Fedora. These “desktop” Linux systems are specifically designed to be as simple as possible to install. It’s important to do an actual partition-based install (as opposed to a “virtual” partition as done by Wubi) because this will ensure you understand the way the partitions are named and the importance of a swap partition.

rest here




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