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How's Ubuntu 10.10

Ubuntu install

I installed three releases ago and then only updated. Maybe 10.10 installer is faulty, I don't know. Anyway I always install from the "alternate" media, which performs a real installation package by package as opposite as slapping a precooked image on the hd.

With the live media I always get a corrupt file system, I don't know how can it be so popular. Maybe it's because I install over xfs rather than the default ext4, but the alternate media always works fine so I never investigated.

I tried Edubuntu 10.10

I tried edubuntu 10.10.
First couple of installs hung. I burned another DVD. Tried again. This time the install completed successfully, but it took almost 50 mins (including LTSP). Then no connection to the internet. Tried all the tricks I know. ifconfig looked normal, but I could not ping anywhere except localhost.
Rebooted and ran it live from the DVD. Internet was back and working fine. Reboot from HD - no internet. I am seriously unimpressed.
Next test: Will Edubuntu 10.10 run on my trusty Acer travelmate 260?
Answer: No! I got a nice jingle from the speakers but screen remained blank.
Next test: Will my trusty Acer travelmate 260 boot from Edubuntu LTSP server?
Answer: No! It gets as far as the login screen, I type my name, press enter and it dies! Bah!

Ubuntu 10.10

The system is great, but the GUI is definitely not. With all the developer power they claim to have, they could patch Gnome into a finished product. Instead, they leave it as the half arsed attempt that it is, only fixing security issues.

So Ubuntu - because of Gnome and the laziness of Canonical - makes Linux look like something with no system sounds, no ability to execute scripts at logout, no logout sound, half working workspace applet when Compiz is enabled, the list goes on. All minor issues, for a workstation, but for a home desktop?

That said, it is still the best Gnome implementation around, and the least time consuming OS around, proprietary ones included, at least in my personal experience.

More in Tux Machines

Stable Kernels: 5.16.3, 5.15.17, 5.10.94, 5.4.174, 4.19.226, 4.14.263, 4.9.298, and 4.4.300

I'm announcing the release of the 5.16.3 kernel.

All users of the 5.16 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.16.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.16.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.15.17 Linux 5.10.94 Linux 5.4.174 Linux 4.19.226 Linux 4.14.263 Linux 4.9.298 Linux 4.4.300

Android Leftovers

Free Software Events in Europe and Australia

  • The FSFE at FOSDEM 2022 - FSFE

    This year's edition will be kicked off by a talk of Masafumi Ohta, teaching on Free Software license and compliances at the University of Electro-Communications in Japan at 13:00 CET. In his talk, Ohta addresses the issue on "How to teach OSS licenses and compliances at a university". At 13:30 CET, Italo Vignoli, a well-known Free Software advocate and a marketing and public relations consultant, gives a presentation on "Why the pandemic could help FOSS, but was a win for proprietary software".

  • FOSDEM 2022 schedule with embedded Linux, IoT, automotive... sessions - CNX Software

    While typically taking place in Brussels, Belgium, FOSDEM 2022 will take place online just like FOSDEM 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions. The good news is that it means anybody can attend it live from anywhere in the world, and makes it more like “FOSDIM”, replacing European with International, in “Free and Open Source Developers’ European Meeting”. FOSDEM 2022 will take place on February 5-6 with 637 speakers, 718 events, and 103 tracks. I’ve made my own little virtual schedule below mostly with sessions from the Embedded, Mobile and Automotive devroom, but also other devrooms including “Computer Aided Modeling and Design”, “FOSS on Mobile Devices”, “Libre-Open VLSI and FPGA”, and others.

  • Talking digital with Brian Kernighan | Opensource.com

    Brian Kernighan has written many popular books about programming, computers, and technology. My own bookshelf includes several books authored or co-authored by Kernighan, including The C Programming Language, Unix: A History and A Memoir, The AWK Programming Language, and others. I just added another book by Kernighan, Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy, and Security, Second Edition, published in 2021 by Princeton University Press.

  • Australia/NZ Linux Meetings « etbe - Russell Coker

    I am going to start a new Linux focused FOSS online meeting for people in Australia and nearby areas. People can join from anywhere but the aim will be to support people in nearby areas. To cover the time zone range for Australia this requires a meeting on a weekend, I’m thinking of the first Saturday of the month at 1PM Melbourne/Sydney time, that would be 10AM in WA and 3PM in NZ. We may have corner cases of daylight savings starting and ending on different days, but that shouldn’t be a big deal as I think those times can vary by an hour either way without being too inconvenient for anyone. Note that I describe the meeting as Linux focused because my plans include having a meeting dedicated to different versions of BSD Unix and a meeting dedicated to the HURD. But those meetings will be mainly for Linux people to learn about other Unix-like OSs.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • DevSecOps: Why you should care and how to get started | Red Hat Developer

    The increasing popularity of DevOps software development methodologies has led to shorter and more agile life cycles, in which software is released and deployed in minutes or hours rather than the days, weeks, or even months required under traditional practices. However, many development teams still experience delays in getting releases into production due to the security considerations that are traditionally brought to bear at the end of the life cycle. To address this, organizations are more and more frequently adopting a DevSecOps approach.

  • Let’s try to do marketing as a team again!

    I’ve announced in the Mindshare, Design and Ambassadors mailing lists that I will try to revive the Marketing team. Previously the marketing team was in charge of several tasks related to how the Fedora Project displays information to the public, working closely with Design, that produces assets, and Ambassadors, who attend events promoting Fedora Linux and the Fedora Project. The work of the team mostly focused on communicating the changes and new features in each release as bullet points that Ambassadors could use in their events.

  • Discover and remediate security vulnerabilities faster with Red Hat Insights

    I woke up this morning and heard about the latest vulnerability in my news feed. Today it was polkit/pwnkit, a couple weeks ago it was something else. (And another will be along shortly, no doubt.) When these come out the impact on IT teams are huge and for anyone responsible for managing systems, one of your first thoughts is "am I exposed and to what extent?" If you are using Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), you can use Red Hat Insights to find out what systems are exposed, and to what extent.

  • What's new for developers in Java 18

    In exciting news for Java developers, Java 18 forked off from the main line at the end of last year and has entered Rampdown Phase Two. This article highlights some of the features that developers can look for in the upcoming Java 18 release, including the new simple web server module, a more sophisticated way to annotate your Javadocs, and the –finalization=disabled option, which lets you test how a Java application will behave when finalization is removed in a future release. See the end of the article for where to download Java 18 in early access builds.

  • IT leadership: 3 practices to let go of in 2022

    While many organizations’ IT teams have toiled away in obscurity for years, the last two decades have increasingly shined a spotlight on the critical role they play. IT has become a zeitgeist in the business world, especially since the pandemic. An increase in remote workers over the last two decades and the pandemic have accelerated greater demand for faster, better, more secure IT practices and infrastructure. Today, employers and employees alike have lofty and varied expectations for their organizations’ technology.