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How's Ubuntu 10.10

GREAT!
20% (208 votes)
Good
15% (161 votes)
Okay
8% (80 votes)
Not so good
4% (43 votes)
Terrible!
3% (35 votes)
I don't Ubuntu
51% (538 votes)
Total votes: 1065

Ubuntu install

I installed three releases ago and then only updated. Maybe 10.10 installer is faulty, I don't know. Anyway I always install from the "alternate" media, which performs a real installation package by package as opposite as slapping a precooked image on the hd.

With the live media I always get a corrupt file system, I don't know how can it be so popular. Maybe it's because I install over xfs rather than the default ext4, but the alternate media always works fine so I never investigated.

I tried Edubuntu 10.10

I tried edubuntu 10.10.
First couple of installs hung. I burned another DVD. Tried again. This time the install completed successfully, but it took almost 50 mins (including LTSP). Then no connection to the internet. Tried all the tricks I know. ifconfig looked normal, but I could not ping anywhere except localhost.
Rebooted and ran it live from the DVD. Internet was back and working fine. Reboot from HD - no internet. I am seriously unimpressed.
Next test: Will Edubuntu 10.10 run on my trusty Acer travelmate 260?
Answer: No! I got a nice jingle from the speakers but screen remained blank.
Next test: Will my trusty Acer travelmate 260 boot from Edubuntu LTSP server?
Answer: No! It gets as far as the login screen, I type my name, press enter and it dies! Bah!

Ubuntu 10.10

The system is great, but the GUI is definitely not. With all the developer power they claim to have, they could patch Gnome into a finished product. Instead, they leave it as the half arsed attempt that it is, only fixing security issues.

So Ubuntu - because of Gnome and the laziness of Canonical - makes Linux look like something with no system sounds, no ability to execute scripts at logout, no logout sound, half working workspace applet when Compiz is enabled, the list goes on. All minor issues, for a workstation, but for a home desktop?

That said, it is still the best Gnome implementation around, and the least time consuming OS around, proprietary ones included, at least in my personal experience.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

  • GOL World Tour: Linux Gaming From Canada
    This time, GOL World Tour goes back to the Americas - this time to Canada to see what the country has to offer Linux gamers and who the companies are making those games.
  • Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel released for Linux
  • Brutal Legend to make a return for PC/Mac/Linux
    IndieBox which is a game distributor that specializes in the distribution of Indie titles has apparently done a deal with Double Fine to do a Limited Edition release of Brutal Legend for PC, Mac, and Linux. The release is celebrate the fifth anniversary of game and it is the first time that the game has gotten a physical release on the PC.
  • Civ: Beyond Earth lands on Mac, Linux this holiday season
    "Players anxious to take a turn at the Mac and Linux versions may pre-order Beyond Earth right now through Aspyr's online store at GameAgent.com," reads 2K Games' official announcement. "All pre-orders through GameAgent.com will include the Exoplanets Map Pack as a free bonus. Additionally, any customers who are established GameAgent members will find a note on the Beyond Earth product page that will grant them a special 15% pre-order discount. This offer expires once the Mac and Linux versions of Beyond Earth have launched."
  • Skully's Free Game Tips: Anomaly Warzone Earth
    An extraordinary twist of the tower defence genre that puts you in control of the armoured convoy making its way through the heavily defended streets of a city captured by the alien invaders.

Introducing Gthree

I’ve recently been working on OpenGL support in Gtk+, and last week it landed in master. However, the demos we have are pretty lame and are not very good to show off or even test the OpenGL support. I’ve looked around for some open source demos that used modern GL that we could use, but I didn’t find anything that we could easily use. What I did find though, was a lot of WebGL demos that used three.js. This looked like a very nice open source library for highlevel 3d rendering. At first I had some plans to bind OpenGL to gjs so that we could run three.js, but this turned out to be a hard. Instead I started converting three.js into C + GObject, using the Gtk+ OpenGL support and the vector/matrix library graphene that Emmanuele has been working on recently. Read more

Swiss crowdfund pays for signed PDFs LibreOffice

In just three days, the Swiss open source community Wilhelm Tux reached its crowdfunding target of 10,000 CHF (about 8000 euro) to add support for digital signatures in PDF documents. The feature will be added to LibreOffice, a free and open source suite of office productivity tools. The project is awarded to Collabora, an open source IT service provider, which will deliver the new functionality in April. Read more

Tumbleweed, Factory rolling releases to merge

“With the release of openSUSE 13.2 due in November, we realised this was a perfect opportunity to merge our two openSUSE rolling-releases together so users of Tumbleweed can benefit from the developments to our Factory development process over the last few years,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of openSUSE board. “The combined feedback and contributions from our combined Tumbleweed and Factory users should help keep openSUSE rolling forward even faster, while offering our users the latest and greatest applications on a stable rolling release.” Read more