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How's Ubuntu 10.10

GREAT!
20% (208 votes)
Good
15% (161 votes)
Okay
8% (80 votes)
Not so good
4% (43 votes)
Terrible!
3% (35 votes)
I don't Ubuntu
51% (538 votes)
Total votes: 1065

Ubuntu install

I installed three releases ago and then only updated. Maybe 10.10 installer is faulty, I don't know. Anyway I always install from the "alternate" media, which performs a real installation package by package as opposite as slapping a precooked image on the hd.

With the live media I always get a corrupt file system, I don't know how can it be so popular. Maybe it's because I install over xfs rather than the default ext4, but the alternate media always works fine so I never investigated.

I tried Edubuntu 10.10

I tried edubuntu 10.10.
First couple of installs hung. I burned another DVD. Tried again. This time the install completed successfully, but it took almost 50 mins (including LTSP). Then no connection to the internet. Tried all the tricks I know. ifconfig looked normal, but I could not ping anywhere except localhost.
Rebooted and ran it live from the DVD. Internet was back and working fine. Reboot from HD - no internet. I am seriously unimpressed.
Next test: Will Edubuntu 10.10 run on my trusty Acer travelmate 260?
Answer: No! I got a nice jingle from the speakers but screen remained blank.
Next test: Will my trusty Acer travelmate 260 boot from Edubuntu LTSP server?
Answer: No! It gets as far as the login screen, I type my name, press enter and it dies! Bah!

Ubuntu 10.10

The system is great, but the GUI is definitely not. With all the developer power they claim to have, they could patch Gnome into a finished product. Instead, they leave it as the half arsed attempt that it is, only fixing security issues.

So Ubuntu - because of Gnome and the laziness of Canonical - makes Linux look like something with no system sounds, no ability to execute scripts at logout, no logout sound, half working workspace applet when Compiz is enabled, the list goes on. All minor issues, for a workstation, but for a home desktop?

That said, it is still the best Gnome implementation around, and the least time consuming OS around, proprietary ones included, at least in my personal experience.

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