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7 months with Windows 7

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Microsoft

Back in late February of this year, I performed an exhaustive test to see where Desktop Linux distributions stood in comparison to Windows 7. At that time, I discovered that Windows 7 is actually a really great operating system and seeing the amount of potential, I began to shift towards using it full time at home. As time passed I moved further away from Desktop Linux until it had been purged from my primary home computer completely.

Don’t take this the wrong way, I haven’t abandoned Linux. I still happily maintain and support Jupiter for the Aurora team, and I do use Aurora here as well. My usage at home has simply changed somewhat, and for the better.

So, what is it about Windows that makes it as good as, or better than Desktop Linux?




Re: 7 months with Windows 7

This guy is absolutely correct. The question is that what he says of Win7 can be said of Linux, and I like UNIX better, it sexes me up more. Plus it requires next to no maintenance to the filesystem and no clumsy defrag running in the background, and little time to update the software installed, which doesn't feel like random different stuff crammed together.

Oh and don't forget the community, you get to talk to the developers. I personally found a fix for ALSA for my laptop that was included upstream and is now on computers the world over, can't beat the feeling!

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