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Microsoft Death Watch

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Microsoft

It was chance that led me to this opinionated blog by the Mad Hatter:

In the fall of 2009 I predicted that Microsoft would enter Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection in five years, based on my reading of their United States Security and Exchange Commission filings. That was before I was aware that Microsoft was in debt -- my thanks to Dr. Roy over at Techrights for digging out this information. Attempting to fully evaluate Microsoft's current financial health is difficult. The company regularly moves products from one division to another. While other companies also do this, in Microsoft's case a lot of the moves appear to make to have no rational basis, leading me to believe that Microsoft is doing this to hide the true financial health of the company.

Which I might easily dismiss, were it not for the several others who share similar opinions, such as the aforementioned Dr. Roy Schestowitz who has been writing about Microsoft debt for a while. Or Robert Pogson, whom Dr. Schestowitz cites:

rest here




Also: 2010 acquisitions--Microsoft: 0, Google: 23

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