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Microsoft Exec Says 'Open' Means 'Incompetent'

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Microsoft
OSS

Glyn Moody points us to the news that a Microsoft exec is criticizing the Brazilian government's support for open source software using some pretty weak arguments. This isn't new. For years, any government that supports open source software is attacked (falsely) as not supporting private enterprise. However, what's really ridiculous here is that the Microsoft exec in question, Hernan Rincon, president of Microsoft Latin America, seems to be making even more specious arguments than usual, claiming that "open" really is a way of saying "incompetent":

"When you can not compete, you are declaring open. This masks incompetence." (translated)

More here




but, but...

I thought MS "Loves" open source. Isn't that what they just said publicly not just a week or two ago or so?

Wow, they love it, but they think it's incompetent.

I guess if any company should know incompetent, it's MS.

funny story really.

Big Bear

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