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Windows 7 vs Ubuntu 10.04

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Linux’s fight to dislodge Windows as the people’s desktop operating system of choice has been a long, sometimes bitter and ultimately unsuccessful one.

Despite the bombastic predictions of open-source advocates, and a short-lived spell as the default netbook operating system, Linux remains at the very margins of mainstream computing. Even among PC Pro’s technically literate readership, only 4% are running a Linux OS, according to the visitor stats for this website.

However, something rather extraordinary is happening in the Linux world. Amid all the distros that have come and gone over the years, one finally has the potential, the momentum and the commercial backing to at least challenge the Windows hegemony.

Ubuntu 10.04 is the most mature, user-friendly and feature-packed Linux desktop OS to date. From the Wubi installer – which installs the operating system with the ease of a regular Windows app – to the built-in music store, online backup service and comprehensive driver support, Ubuntu 10.04 has the unmistakable demeanour of a mainstream OS. It even looks nice.

But is it good enough?

Windows 7 vs Ubuntu 10.04

I'd use Windows 7 before I'd use Ubuntu if those were my only choices. Thank goodness I have options at least for now.

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