Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Tiny drives set for space boost

Filed under
Hardware

Hitachi has said it can fit 230 gigabits of data per square inch on a disk using "perpendicular recording"
The storage industry currently makes hard drives using longitudinal recording, which is reaching its limit.

Hitachi's work means we could see one-inch hard drives holding 60Gb instead of up to 10Gb currently.

One terabyte is the equivalent of 1,000Gb - enough to hold 240,000 songs at the standard encoding rate for digital music files.

Perpendicular recording was pioneered by the late 19th century work of Danish scientist Valdemar Poulsen, who demonstrated magnetic recording with his telegraphone.

He is widely thought to have been the first to experiment with magnetically recorded sound using perpendicular methods.

The technology industry wants smaller hard drives that hold more information to go into all kinds of digital devices like portable music players.

As storage prices come down and data capacity increases, more portable devices are coming out with built-in hard drives, such as music and media players from Apple, Creative Labs, Archos, iRiver and others.

"Consumers' demand for storing more data on smaller devices has provided a strong impetus for us to pursue perpendicular recording with a greater sense of urgency," he said.

But there are limits to this process, which are fast being approached. The biggest problem hard drive technology faces is what is called the superparamagnetic effect.

This is when microscopic magnetic grains on the disk get so tiny that they interfere with one another. Often this results in reduced ability to hold their magnetic orientations. When this happens, bits of data can become corrupt.

Perpendicular recording methods overcomes the problem and aligns data bits vertically, perpendicular to the disk.

Hitachi said it would start using perpendicular recording in the next generation of its products, in 2007. Over the next five to seven years, it said, perpendicular recording could mean a 10-fold increase in data densities over longitudinal recording.

This means its one-inch drive technology could store 60Gb of data.

Full Story.

Seagate also in HD stakes with its own perpendicular recording hard drive. Hitachi's first drives to use perpendicular recording will use 2.5-inch platters, while Toshiba plans 1.8-inch drives. Seagate quietly delivered its first samples at the end of 2004.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more