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Comings and goings in the Linux gaming world

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Gaming

Today, I'm going to discuss the interesting phenomena, rise and fall of companies, games, technologies, and other cool stuff, all related to Linux gaming. So, this is not exactly a review, but we will definitely talk about the hot cakes in the gaming oven.

The Humble Indie Bundle

This was a tremendously successful experiment into greedless marketing. Rather than setting prices high for their games, the Humble Indie team put their five-game bundle on sale for as little as anyone was willing to pay, be that one cent or a thousand dollars. Now, if we're to listen to MPIA or RIAA or any brutal, merciless tycoon in the digital industry, this kind of thing is a sales madness, with profits bound to drop, right?

Well, wrong. The Humble Bundle was a supreme success, with USD1.2 million collected from close to 150,000 contributors, with 35% proceedings donated to charity and average USD9 dollar per sale. End result? The offered games are now going open-source, which should make them even more popular.

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