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Linux Mint Debian review

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Linux

Linux Mint Debian is the latest addition to Mint’s suite of Linux desktops. Mint has long promoted itself as a distribution based on Ubuntu and Debian, a claim that I have long discounted as misleading. This release, while still experimental, is one, as the name implies, that is truly based on Debian.

The package manager is pointed at Debian’s testing, instead of to Ubuntu’s repository, and the installer is different too. Since almost every other aspect of this release is the same as the main edition’s, this short review is focused almost entirely on the features of the new installation program.

Installation: The boot options. This edition is, of course, a live DVD edition.

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not a full review, hope there will be more...

The author of LinuxBSDos is at this point primarily critiquing the installation process of the newly offered LinuxMint Debian beta release.
Questions like; why not borrow the whole Debian install process? installation being allowed without swap being setup? Why not have a Linux Security package category? are good questions which already have an answer in the workings of the final release.
I hope readers (Mint'ers esp.) take this into account as there are some pertinent questions, but which may seem harsh for some.

Review: Linux Mint "Debian"

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: The first thing I see is a standard Linux Mint boot menu — no surprises here. Though I picked the default option, there was no boot splash to speak of — there was only a running console commentary of the boot process. That said, the boot process was rather fast, and I was soon greeted by a standard Linux Mint desktop; there is visually no difference between Linux Mint "Debian" and Linux Mint 9 "Isadora" GNOME. The MintMenu is the same, as are the panel, desktop layout, icons, and window decorations.

As I played around with the desktop, I wondered if the developers rebranded Mozilla Firefox as Iceweasel as per Debian (and Crunchbang 10) standards. Surprisingly, Mozilla Firefox is present with the original branding; less surprising is the presence of most proprietary codecs. OpenOffice.org is also present, though a couple of the icons in the program (notably the "Open file" icon) look a little more ugly and drab for some reason (as far as I can tell, other than that, it's the same icon set). More importantly, some of the application menus open to the side of the button instead of below (e.g. "File", "Insert", etc.), meaning the menus cover up the other menu buttons; this is not an especially good design.

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Linux Mint 9 (Debian)

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Each time Ubuntu is updated, we get also get another version of Linux Mint. I usually end up reviewing most of the Linux Mint derivatives of Ubuntu. This time around though, we’ve gotten a delightful surprise from the Linux Mint developers. A Debian version of Linux Mint! Yes, there is now a rolling release Linux Mint distro!

When I found out about it, I couldn’t resist doing a review. Frankly, I was not aware that the Linux Mint developers had even undertaken this project, but I’m very glad that they did. It’s the icing on an already very sweet Linux Mint cake, to say the least.

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