Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Mint Debian review

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint Debian is the latest addition to Mint’s suite of Linux desktops. Mint has long promoted itself as a distribution based on Ubuntu and Debian, a claim that I have long discounted as misleading. This release, while still experimental, is one, as the name implies, that is truly based on Debian.

The package manager is pointed at Debian’s testing, instead of to Ubuntu’s repository, and the installer is different too. Since almost every other aspect of this release is the same as the main edition’s, this short review is focused almost entirely on the features of the new installation program.

Installation: The boot options. This edition is, of course, a live DVD edition.

Rest Here




not a full review, hope there will be more...

The author of LinuxBSDos is at this point primarily critiquing the installation process of the newly offered LinuxMint Debian beta release.
Questions like; why not borrow the whole Debian install process? installation being allowed without swap being setup? Why not have a Linux Security package category? are good questions which already have an answer in the workings of the final release.
I hope readers (Mint'ers esp.) take this into account as there are some pertinent questions, but which may seem harsh for some.

Review: Linux Mint "Debian"

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: The first thing I see is a standard Linux Mint boot menu — no surprises here. Though I picked the default option, there was no boot splash to speak of — there was only a running console commentary of the boot process. That said, the boot process was rather fast, and I was soon greeted by a standard Linux Mint desktop; there is visually no difference between Linux Mint "Debian" and Linux Mint 9 "Isadora" GNOME. The MintMenu is the same, as are the panel, desktop layout, icons, and window decorations.

As I played around with the desktop, I wondered if the developers rebranded Mozilla Firefox as Iceweasel as per Debian (and Crunchbang 10) standards. Surprisingly, Mozilla Firefox is present with the original branding; less surprising is the presence of most proprietary codecs. OpenOffice.org is also present, though a couple of the icons in the program (notably the "Open file" icon) look a little more ugly and drab for some reason (as far as I can tell, other than that, it's the same icon set). More importantly, some of the application menus open to the side of the button instead of below (e.g. "File", "Insert", etc.), meaning the menus cover up the other menu buttons; this is not an especially good design.

Rest Here

Linux Mint 9 (Debian)

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Each time Ubuntu is updated, we get also get another version of Linux Mint. I usually end up reviewing most of the Linux Mint derivatives of Ubuntu. This time around though, we’ve gotten a delightful surprise from the Linux Mint developers. A Debian version of Linux Mint! Yes, there is now a rolling release Linux Mint distro!

When I found out about it, I couldn’t resist doing a review. Frankly, I was not aware that the Linux Mint developers had even undertaken this project, but I’m very glad that they did. It’s the icing on an already very sweet Linux Mint cake, to say the least.

rest here

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Is Canonical the Victim of High Expectations?

When Ubuntu was new, those who questioned it were mostly Debian developers, disgruntled because they were not hired or because Ubuntu failed to acknowledge its debt to Debian. Today, however, a vocal minority seems to view Canonical Software, the company behind Ubuntu, as a Microsoft in the making. From being the uncritical darling of open source, Canonical is closely and cynically scrutinized, and its motives constantly questioned. So how did this transformation happen? Suspicion about corporations is hardly new in open source, yet Canonical seems singled out in a way that SUSE or Red Hat only occasionally are. Read more

Permabit offers deduplication to Linux masses – almost

Permabit has moved beyond OEMs, making the latest release of its dedupe technology available as a Linux software package so that ISVs, professional services folks and systems integrators in its Hybrid Cloud Professional Services partners programme can use it. Previously it was available to OEMs in Albireo (dedupe) and Virtual Data Optimizer or Virtual Data Optimizer, VDO (dedupe+compression+thin provisioning) form. VDO v6 is designed for the cloud service provider market, Permabit says, and the VDO for Hybrid Cloud package simplifies VDO installation and configuration in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) data centres. Read more

Mozilla involves the community in its “open-source” rebrand

Mozilla is bending the terms of the rebrand with a “branding without walls” open-source initiative. Read more

RPi 3 add-on loads up on sensors, wireless radios

Matrix Labs’s FPGA-driven “Matrix Creator” IoT daughter board for the Raspberry Pi 3 is loaded with sensors, 802.15.4 radios, and a mic array. The disc-shaped Matrix Creator add-on for the Raspberry Pi is based on AdMobilize’s successfully Kickstartered Matrix home automation and surveillance hub. AdMobilize spun off Matrix Labs, which has now built this cheaper, board-level version of the product. Read more