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How to Choose a Desktop Linux Distribution

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Linux

With all the many reasons to use Linux today--particularly in a business setting--it's often a relatively easy decision to give Windows the boot. What can be more difficult, however, is deciding which of the hundreds of Linux distributions out there is best for you and your business.

Which one is right for you? That depends on several key factors.

1. Skills

If you or the other people in your office have never used Linux before, you'll probably want to stick with a distribution that's better suited to beginning users. This is one of Ubuntu's defining characteristics, but Fedora, Linux Mint, and business-friendly openSUSE can be good choices as well. Personally, I'd steer a brand-new user to either Ubuntu or Fedora.

Be sure to avoid alpha, beta and release candidate (RC) versions of the software, since they can sometimes be unstable. If, on the other hand, you consider yourself a power user, the more do-it-yourself distributions include Gentoo, Debian, Arch Linux and Slackware; or, with Linux From Scratch, you can even build your own distribution!

2. Focus




once again

Just another thinly veiled "I love ubuntu " article.

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