Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How to Choose a Desktop Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

With all the many reasons to use Linux today--particularly in a business setting--it's often a relatively easy decision to give Windows the boot. What can be more difficult, however, is deciding which of the hundreds of Linux distributions out there is best for you and your business.

Which one is right for you? That depends on several key factors.

1. Skills

If you or the other people in your office have never used Linux before, you'll probably want to stick with a distribution that's better suited to beginning users. This is one of Ubuntu's defining characteristics, but Fedora, Linux Mint, and business-friendly openSUSE can be good choices as well. Personally, I'd steer a brand-new user to either Ubuntu or Fedora.

Be sure to avoid alpha, beta and release candidate (RC) versions of the software, since they can sometimes be unstable. If, on the other hand, you consider yourself a power user, the more do-it-yourself distributions include Gentoo, Debian, Arch Linux and Slackware; or, with Linux From Scratch, you can even build your own distribution!

2. Focus




once again

Just another thinly veiled "I love ubuntu " article.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

Qubes OS 3.2 has been released!

I’m happy to announce that today we’re releasing Qubes OS 3.2! This is an incremental improvement over the 3.1 version that we released earlier this year. A lot of work went into making this release more polished, more stable and easier to use than our previous releases. One major feature that we’ve improved upon in this release is our integrated management infrastructure, which was introduced in Qubes 3.1. Whereas before it was only possible to manage whole VMs, it is now possible to manage the insides of VMs as well. Read more

Red Hat claims headway in Asia, bets big on container and hybrid cloud

While the smallest in terms of revenue contribution, Asia is Red Hat's fastest growing region and is likely to continue its upwards trajectory as emerging markets roll out new infrastructure. Developing nations in the region were embarking on many net new infrastructure projects, rather than replacement for existing technology, and open source would be involved in a large share of such projects. The decisions on which technology to deploy would rarely be between proprietary or open source, but rather on which open source vendor to go with or to do so internally, said Red Hat President and CEO Jim Whitehurst. Read more