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OpenOffice by the book

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OOo

South African organisation Translate.org.za is best known for its work translating open source software into indigenous South African languages. Among these are localisations done for the OpenOffice.org (OOo) office suite which offers features comparable with Microsoft's Office suite.

Now, in addition to translating the software into additional languages, Translate.org.za has also released a book on using OpenOffice.org effectively.

Translate.org.za has so far translated OpenOffice.org version 3.0 into English, Afrikaans and Northern Sotho versions, which are available from their website.

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