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Why this Linux veteran runs Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

I keep hearing Ubuntu described as merely a noob’s distro lately. However, Ubuntu has around 50% of the Linux desktop market share, give or take, but Linux as a whole has only gained a tenth of a percent or so since Ubuntu’s introduction. So either noobs adopted Ubuntu in such numbers that half of Linux veterans switched to Windows in protest, or there are quite a few veterans out there running Ubuntu, but who apparently don’t think it’s cool to admit it.

Well, it’s about time people either come clean or switch already. I’ll start the ball rolling. My name is Karl (Hi, Karl), and I’m a Linux veteran who runs Ubuntu. I switched from Windows 98 to Red Hat, then Mandrake, Suse, Linuxfromscratch, a customized Knoppix for a year when my laptop hard drive crashed and I couldn’t afford to replace it, then Gentoo for about 5 years, and have been running Ubuntu exclusively since Jaunty.

rest here




Is Ubuntu only for new users?

andrioid.net: Recently I participated in Open Source Days 2010 in Copenhagen, Denmark. There was a group booth for the Ubuntu, but for some reason I found myself unwilling to admit that I was an Ubuntu user. Ask anyone; Ubuntu is great for newcomers to the Linux world. However, Ubuntu is not a bad operating system for advanced Linux users either - but it's just not cool.

I've gone through my fair share of Linux distributions. Used Slackware from 1997, then migrated to Redhat because some of my friends at "Linux in Iceland" (now defunct) were promoting it. Since then I've been running RHEL, Centos, Fedora, Debian and after loving Debian - I decided to switch to Ubuntu.

I am not 17 anymore - I simply do not have the time to compile my own kernels, create packages, debug and write config files from scratch for my daily work. I found the experiences from Slackware and Gentoo very satisfying and being able to do-it-yourself felt nice.

Some of the reasons why I find Ubuntu a good choice:

Is this their new marketing

Is this their new marketing campaign to snatch other distributions veteran users? Maybe they should change their name from Canonical to Canibal.

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