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Spin Your Own Debian with Live Studio

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In the tradition of Nimblex and SUSE Studio comes an alternative for those who prefer Debian. Debian Live Studio allows users to build their own Debian Live system with just a few mouse clicks.

After selecting your preferred options, the server builds and readies your image. Users can select from CD, DVD, USB, or Netboot images.

rest here

Also @ Linux Journal today:

Qualcomm's Rob Chandhok joins Linux Foundation board

Live From Boston, LinuxCon 2010


There IS a God.

I'm in a very happy place right now.

Party Applause Big Hug Big Grin Call Me

Big Bear

Will need to check this out...

I'll have to look into this. Currenly I would love to create a Debian-based live distro, but my requirements of custom repos, customized ~/.kde/ and other .config files, and of hand-picked applications just isn't easy to accomplish.

Options such as the Debian Live project are far too complex, while others such as Novo and Reconstructor seem to need a perfect install to create the distro, but then don't use the Debian installer etc when it comes time to use it.

Let's hope this is the best of all worlds?


> Let's hope this is the best of all worlds?

Unfortunately, no it isn't. It spins a pretty standard install, perhaps with a few options but not a ton.

for now

but the potential is there.

Nice but...

There's not much there that isn't already offered "pre-spun".

The choices are (for those that don't want to register):

Standard Debian GNU/Linux image
GNOME desktop environment
KDE desktop environment
Xfce desktop environment
LXDE desktop environment
Debian GNU/Linux rescue image

Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 ("lenny")
Debian GNU/Linux testing distribution ("squeeze")
Debian GNU/Linux unstable distribution ("sid")

ISO image for a CD or DVD
USB / HDD image

i386 (x86_32)
amd64 (x86_64)

No installer integration
"Live" installer integration
Standard installer integration

With those few choices, lets hope they're caching the spin's (if they already haven't created all of them in the first place).

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