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Lightspark VS Flash: Benchmarked

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Software

The team behind open-source Flash alternative LightSpark pushed out a new bug-fix release a few days ago.

Seeing as we're a few releases in, I felt now was a prime time to see just how well LightSpark performs against its proprietary counterpart - particularly so I have a benchmark which to compare future releases against.

Now, you don't need to be remotely "on-the-ball" to predict that LightSpark won't out-whoop the real Flash plug-in, but if users are considering taking a performance hit by switching they might want to know exactly how big a hit it will actually be...

Tests




Bye to flash

Can't wait until Flash is depreciated off my computer and the intertubes.

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