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Is Google About to Sell the Internet Down the River?

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Google
Web

So far, so conventional. But there is a joker in the pack in this game: Google. It's striking that the bigger the company gets, the more it moves away from its natural geek roots, and its reflexive defence of everything that is important to hackers. And so where once you would have expected it naturally and proudly to line up with the rest of the Internet's little people in defending Net neutrality to the hilt, you find it executing subtle crab-like movements that suggests a more troubling, Machiavellian approach. Here's precisely what I'm talking about:

"People get confused about Net neutrality," Schmidt said. "I want to make sure that everybody understands what we mean about it. What we mean is that if you have one data type, like video, you don't discriminate against one person's video in favor of another. It's OK to discriminate across different types...There is general agreement with Verizon and Google on this issue.”

People aren't confused about Net neutrality, actually, Eric: it means that you transmit bits without paying any attention to their details - not according to who sent them, who will receive them or, despite what you would have us believe, what kind of traffic they represent.

rest here




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