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Choosing a desktop Linux distro

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Linux

Probably everyone who reads DesktopLinux.com -- and certainly yours truly -- encounters the same question over and over again: "What's the best Linux desktop distribution?" Now, while some people will swear up and down that Slackware or Fedora or even Puppy, for that matter, is the best Linux desktop, I think the answer is more complicated. In fact, I don't think there is a single answer.

I think the best Linux desktop is the one that's best for a particular person based on their needs and level of Linux expertise. So, the next time someone asks you that question, I suggest you reply with a couple of questions of your own.

For example, you could ask, "Do you want to replace Windows? For home? For work? Are you interested in Linux because you want to get some new life out of an old system? Do you just want to mess around with Linux? And so on...

Then, once you know where they're coming from, you can give the best possible answer.

For what it's worth, here's what I'd tell someone today based on some of the more common answers I get to my questions.

Full Story.


Also on same site today:

Pertec Inc. last week introduced UbuntUSB, touted as an easy way to install Ubuntu Linux on a portable USB hard drive, letting any PC boot Ubuntu Linux without requiring either BIOS or system reconfiguration.

UbuntUSB installs a bootable version of Ubuntu on any USB hard drive with a capacity of 10 GB or greater in less than 15 minutes, spokesman Guillaume Darbonne said.

Ubuntu hitches a ride on USB drives.


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