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Original Articles from 2009

  1. Should Pulseaudio Die? What do you think?* - Dec 29, 09
  2. Fedora 12 – A Popular Linux Distro You Might Want To Try - Dec 11, 09
  3. openSUSE 11.2 – For New Users and Pros Alike - Dec 7, 09
  4. Desktop Recording on my Laptop* - Nov 26, 09
  5. Timed downloads* - Nov 19, 09
  6. openSUSE 11.2: Let's wait for 11.3 - Nov 19, 09
  7. Benchmark Your System With PTS Desktop Live - Nov 18, 09
  8. 3 Sites To Help You Become A CommandLine Master - Nov 16, 09
  9. Hitch your wagon to a lizard: dist-upgrading openSUSE* - Nov 15, 09
  10. Paranoia and criticism, how it was meant and how it is taken* - Nov 12, 09
  11. Mandriva Linux 2010 – Perhaps The Best Linux Release All Year - Nov 10, 2009
  12. How To Secure Your D-Link Wireless Router - Nov 9, 2009
  13. GoblinX – An Alternative OS With 4 Different Flavors - Nov 2, 2009
  14. Machinarium - A Tasty Gaming Treat - Oct 29, 2009
  15. In Search of KDE 4 - Oct 15, 2009
  16. Sabayon Linux Five Point OH! - Oct 12, 2009
  17. Top 10 Linux Distributions of 2009 - Oct 12, 2009
  18. Puppy Linux 4.3 and Woof - Sep 30, 2009
  19. SAM Linux - Great little OS - Aug 31, 2009
  20. Quick Tip: Old games can't find /dev/dsp - Aug 22, 2009
  21. Linux Got Game! - Aug 19, 2009
  22. Will I Go Back?* - July 30, 2009
  23. Toorox - July 22, 2009
  24. One Linux to rule them all* - Jul 8, 2009
  25. The Ubuntu 1-click dist-upgrade (well, almost)* - Jun 30, 2009
  26. OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters"* - May 22, 2009
  27. Before Ubuntu Was SimplyMepis: A Long-Term Review - May 11, 2009
  28. Six New Mobile Devices Running Open Source - Apr 9, 2009
  29. A great new theme for PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - Apr 3, 2009
  30. PR Wars: Apple vs MS...Does Linux need to even bother?* - Apr 3, 2009
  31. SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 Feature Tour - Apr 1, 2009
  32. Taking your first Linux baby steps - Mar 24, 2009
  33. VectorLinux 6.0 - Mar 19, 2009
  34. KNOPPIX 6.0 - Feb 11, 2009
  35. How to add Awn main menu applet in AWN 0.3.2* - Feb 09, 2009
  36. Sabayon Linux 4 - Feb 05, 2009
  37. OpenSolaris distros - Jan 12, 2009
  38. XBMC* - Jan 11, 2009
  39. Easy Peasy Eeebuntu Netbooks* - Jan 8, 2009
  40. Slowly moving people to Linux via OpenSource Apps* - Jan 3, 2009
  41. Why the world isn't ready for Linux* - Dec 30, 2008

* - Posts by other contributers.










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