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OpenSSO, Neglected by Oracle, Gets Second Life

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Software

A Norwegian startup is assuming responsibility for maintaining an open source Web authentication technology originally developed by Sun Microsystems, and seemingly neglected by Oracle, which purchased Sun in January.

The company, ForgeRock, has released a new version of Sun's Open Single Sign On (OpenSSO) Enterprise software, called OpenAM, that adheres to the OpenSSO roadmap established by Sun.

"It's a pretty easy migration path for all the customers who have found themselves stranded on OpenSSO. They can safely migrate to a current version," said Simon Phipps, chief strategy officer at ForgeRock, and former chief open source officer at Sun. Phipps was one of a number of employees who have joined ForgeRock since Oracle's purchase of Sun.

Oracle continues to display a page on its Web site for OpenSSO, though it has removed the free downloadable version of the product. The company has not made any announcements about future releases of the software, and did not respond to a request for comment.

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