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How to improve Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

The latest Ubuntu release is very good and does not need any major fixes or improvements. Still, during my recent testing spree, which led me to no less than five separate installations of Lucid, I encountered a few small issues that Ubuntu could happily live without. Then, I thought of a few more things that could be added/removed and so, this article was born.

The general principle of continuous improvement is valid for just about any operating system, so singling out Ubuntu seemed a little unfair and skewed, but given the facts it is the most popular desktop distro and Lucid being the three-year LTS release with a radical new interface, this is a good opportunity to think of features and concepts that could be brushed up toward the next version.

The mission of fixing, linting and polishing the bruises and dents in the distribution has started some time ago, called 100 Paper Cuts, with every new edition featuring an additional 100 tiny problems removed, be it a spelling mistake, a misaligned pixel, a confusing option, or anything else. While I do not pretend to be the GUI QA master of this world, I did find a few things that, if fixed, could immensely pimp up the Ubuntu desktop experience.

Ubuntu improvements, Dedoimedo style




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