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How An Old Pentium 4 System Runs With Ubuntu 10.04, 10.10

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Ubuntu

Last October I wrote about running Ubuntu 9.10 with older PC hardware, but over this past weekend I restored an even older Phoronix test system to see how it runs with the most recent Ubuntu 10.04 LTS release and the very latest Ubuntu 10.10 development snapshot in relation to the older Ubuntu 8.04.4 LTS. This antiquated system has an Intel Pentium 4 2.8GHz CPU, 512MB of RAM, an 80GB IDE hard drive, and an ATI Radeon 9200PRO AGP graphics card.

The complete list of system components for this retired test system include an Abit SG72 motherboard with SiS 661FX chipset, an Intel Pentium 4 C 2.80GHz CPU with Hyper Threading, 512MB of DDR-400 system memory, an 80GB Western Digital WD800JB-00ET hard drive, and an ATI Radeon 9200PRO (0x9560) graphics card. First this system was tested with a clean install of Ubuntu 8.04.4 LTS boasting the Linux 2.6.24 kernel, GNOME 2.22.3, X.Org Server 1.4.0.90, xf86-video-radeon 4.3.0, Mesa 7.0.3-rc2, GCC 4.2.4, and an EXT3 file-system. Ubuntu 10.04 LTS was tested with its Linux 2.6.32 kernel, GNOME 2.30.0 desktop, X.Org Server 1.7.6, xf86-video-radeon 6.13.0, GCC 4.4.3, Mesa 7.7.1, and an EXT4 file-system. Lastly, the Ubuntu 10.10 snapshot from 2010-07-11 contained the Linux 2.6.35 kernel, GNOME 2.30.2, X.Org Server 1.8.2 RC2, xf86-video-radeon 6.13.1, GCC 4.4.4, and an EXT4 file-system.

Tests that were run via the Phoronix Test Suite included OpenArena, Apache, PostgreSQL, C-Ray, 7-Zip, PostMark, Gcrypt, Himeno, and TTSIOD 3D Renderer.

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