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Book Review: Foundation Blender Compositing by Roger Wickes

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Hardly anyone realizes that Blender even is a video compositing and non-linear editing tool (in addition to its modeling, rendering, and animation capabilities). There are few, if any, books available on how to use it for that purpose, so Roger Wickes’ book is much needed. It contains an enormous amount of very useful information.

Read the full review at Free Software Magazine

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