Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NetworkManager will drive people away from GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

One of the great plus points about running GNU/Linux used to be the continuous process of improvement going on - and the fact that one did not have to wait very long to sample those improvements if one wished to do so.

The additional plus about experimenting was the fact that in practically all cases there were sensible defaults set for the newer applications, defaults that would not screw up your existing set-up.

But in recent times, given the great push to make everything running on GNU/Linux graphically-oriented, that seems to have changed. I've been burned over the last couple of days.

Debian testing is my distribution of choice for desktops and laptops and I've been happily running it for the last six-odd years.

rest here




Bah, install Wicd

I've never been happy with the GNOME-centric NetworkManager in either its GNOME or KDE forms. I install Wicd on all of my (graphical) machines and it always works great, including picking up hardware that for some reason the others won't see.

Wicd is just that — wickedly good!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more