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Dell in talks with Google over Chrome OS

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OS

Dell Inc is in talks with Google Inc over the use of the Chrome operating system on its laptops, a top company executive said on Monday.

"We have to have a point of view on the industry and technology direction two years, three years down the road, so we continuously work with Google on this," Amit Midha, Dell's president for Greater China and South Asia told Reuters in an interview.

"There are going to be unique innovations coming up in the marketplace in two, three years, with a new form of computing, we want to be on that forefront ... So with Chrome or Android or anything like that we want to be one of the leaders," Midha said, adding that there were no firm announcements to be made but talks were underway.

Google has said it expects to release its Chrome computer operating system in the "late fall" as it aims a competitive strike at rival Microsoft's Windows.

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