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What's Inside The Apple iMac

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Mac

Apple Computer Inc.'s iMac desktop PC, introduced by CEO Steve Jobs at last week's MacWorld Expo, is the latest target in iSuppli Corp.'s teardown analysis.

iSuppli found that Apple's first desktop PC based on an Intel Corp. Core Duo microprocessor carries a list of components that cost approximately $873, according to preliminary data. And the iMac could turn into another cash machine for Apple similar to iTunes and the iPod.

The move for Apple marks a major departure from IBM Corp.'s and Freescale Inc.'s PowerPC chips. The Apple iMac and the Intel-based MacBook Pro notebook PC is part of a planned transition for all its notebook, desktop, and server PCs to the Intel architecture, according to iSuppli.

Although Apple rarely shares any information on the components or costs built into its products, iSuppli has identified the computer maker is using Intel's mobile 945 core-logic chipset to support the Core Duo microprocessor, and estimates the cost for the microprocessor at $265. The two-device chipsets are approximately $45.

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