Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

There will never be a "Year of Linux" on the desktop OS

Filed under
Linux

Several months ago, I started a discussion on TechRepublic about whether or not Linux was suitable for the corporate desktop. At the time, I had discovered windows floating in front of the screen saver for anyone to read, even though the Linux desktop was locked and those windows should have been hidden. I wanted to know if this was a frequently-encountered issue, and if so, had it been addressed and resolved. My point was that I had never seen anything like this happen on a Windows desktop (or a Mac OS desktop, for that matter).

Since then, I applied countless patches and fixes to my Ubuntu box, which is running 9.04 because 9.10 just hung when I attempted to update it. However, my desktop windows still continued to float in front of my screensaver, for the entire world to see, even though the machine was locked. That’s strike 2 for Ubuntu Linux on this matter.

As a HIPAA regulated industry, something like this is a huge deal to me, and it means I will absolutely never consider Ubuntu as a viable alternative desktop OS for the 200 desktop users at my office. I grabbed a screenshot and a video of the issue with my Droid, but I needed to obscure some information that was visible before I submitted the following picture to TechRepublic.

In my mind, the bigger problem is the lack of accountability that I’ve encounter with the Linux community.




Sweeping statements

Sweeping statements in he headline and inflammatory images are not means for receiving good advice, either.

Sweeping statements--you got that right...

I am sick and tired of know-nothings speaking about desktop Linux (or, in Thompson's blog, "the corporate desktop").

Ubuntu does not equal Linux.

Specifically:

Ubuntu does not equal desktop Linux. Further research by the blog writer would have shown that Canonical (the company funding Ubuntu) decided to go with their own screen notifications popup system. This, in no way, characterizes the entire Linux desktop experience. In fact, I'm running Kubuntu KDE desktop linux on my trial desktop box, also from Canonical (though a somewhat neglected stepchild), where the screensaver screen lock is not (AFAICT) compromised by notification pop-ups. Nor does the screensaver lock appear to be compromised on my main Mandriva system.

However, Thompson's comment here is somewhat accurate:

Quote:
In my mind, the bigger problem is the lack of accountability that I’ve encounter [sic] with the Linux community.

What you generally get with Linux is freedom and diversity, not (some corporate notion of) accountability. So be it.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments. Read more Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module

Programming: ThreadStack and Qt for WebAssembly

  • ThreadStack: Yet Another C++ Project Trying To Make Multi-Threading Easier
    ThreadStack is yet another C++ project trying to make it easier dealing with multiple CPU threads. This latest open-source C++ threading project comes out of academia research. ThreadStack is self-described by its developer, Erkam Murat Bozkurt, as "an innovative software which produces a class library for C++ multi-thread programming and the outcome of the ThreadStack acts as an autonomous management system for the thread synchronization tasks. ThreadStack has a nice and useful graphical user interface and includes a short tutorial and code examples. ThreadStack offers a new way for multi-thread computing and it uses a meta program in order to produce an application specific thread synchronization library." Erkam has been working the rounds trying to raise awareness for this research on the GCC and LLVM mailing lists.
  • Beta for Qt for WebAssembly Technology Preview
    WebAssembly is a bytecode format intended to be executed in a web browser. This allows an application to be deployed to a device with a compliant web browser without going through any explicit installation steps. The application will be running inside a secure sandbox in the web browser, making it appropriate for applications that do not need full access to the device capabilities, but benefits from a swift and uncomplicated installation process.
  • Qt for WebAssembly Tech Preview Reaches Beta
    As part of next month's Qt 5.11 tool-kit update, a new technology preview module will be WebAssembly support for running Qt5 user-interfaces within your web-browser.

today's howtos

Kernel and Graphics: BUS1, Linux 4.17 RC2, Wayland's Weston and Mesa

  • BUS1 Still Remains Out Of The Mainline Linux Kernel, But DBus-Broker Continues
    The BUS1 in-kernel IPC mechanism born out of the ashes of KDBUS still hasn't been mainlined in the Linux kernel, but its code is still improved upon from time to time. At least though DBus-Broker as a new performance-oriented D-Bus implementation continues gaining ground in user-space. DBus-Broker was announced last year as a new message bus implementation of D-Bus focused on high performance and reliability while continuing to offer compatibility with the original D-Bus implementation.
  • Linux 4.17-rc2 Kernel Released With Mostly Routine Changes
    Linus Torvalds has announced the availability of the second weekly test release for what is becoming the Linux 4.17 kernel.
  • Wayland's Weston Gets Optimizations For Its Pixman Renderer
    Wayland's Weston reference compositor with its Pixman software-based renderer back-end has received a number of performance optimizations. Fabien Lahoudere of Collabora posted a set of patches today to optimize the Pixman renderer for Weston. In particular, there are optimizations around compositing damage to the screen as well as optimizing the shadow buffer usage. The Weston Pixman renderer is often used as a software accelerated fallback in cases where no GPU hardware acceleration may be available. As implied by the name, it uses the long-standing Pixman library that is also used by Cairo, the X.Org Server, etc, for pixel manipulation on the CPU.
  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver For ARM Mali Can Now Render A Cube
    The Panfrost open-source driver project previously known as "Chai" for creating an open-source 3D driver stack for ARM's Mali Midgard hardware now has a working shaded cube being rendered using the open-source code as part of its new "half-way" driver based on Gallium3D.