Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Six Distributions, one HP 2133 Mini-Note

Filed under
Linux

My HP 2133 Mini-Note with WSVGA (1024x600) display has been out on loan for several months. It came back a week or so ago, and as it had missed the latest wave of Linux distribution updates, I decided to reload it from scratch. It originally came with SuSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 (SLED 10), and NO WINDOWS (Hooray!). I had preserved SLED 10 in a small partition "just in case", but it is now so old that it would not be of any use whatever may happen, so I wiped it as well, and started from a completely clean disk.

The HP Mini-Note is not the easiest netbook to support, with its VIA C7-M CPU, Chrome 9 graphic controller and Broadcom 4312 wireless networking adapter. So far I have loaded the following six Linux distributions. All were loaded from Live USB media, all installed and configured quite easily and all handled the hardware with varying degrees of tweaking and human intervention. I have noted the peculiarities of each installation below. I would like to emphasize that all of these screen shots were taken on the 2133, they show the actual results of the installation of each of these distributions.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more