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iPed versus iPad: looking for Android tablets

If anyone's coming back from China, I hope they're bringing back an iPed, as reported on Japanese TV news. This looks like the first iPadalike to go on sale*, and a large part of its appeal is the low price ($105). However, I expect some rather more expensive devices will be shown at this week's Computex trade show in Taiwan, starting with MSI's Wind Pad 110, which has an ARM processor running Google's Android mobile phone operating system. Acer, Dell and Lenovo are also tipped to enter the market at some point.

According to The Wall Street Journal: "Bob Morris, ARM's director of mobile computing, says his company is tracking about 40 tablet-style devices being designed with ARM-based chips, plus about 10 more e-reader devices for electronic books. He estimated that 'upwards of half' are based on Android."

Apple's iPad is basically an iPod Touch XL, so I don't see any reason why Google's mobile phone software should not be similarly upscaled for the mid-sized tablet format. It might not have the polish of Apple's software, but polish isn't everything. There are other things in life, including diversity and freedom of choice, as well as price.

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