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mintInstall 7.1.5: speed improvements

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Software

A new version of the Software Manager is available in the repository. You can use the Update Manager to upgrade to it.

The Software Manager was rewritten from scratch in Linux Mint 9. It’s a very complex application, and it can be improved in many ways. Today we tackled the time it takes for the application to start. Basically it needs to process some 30,000 packages, a growing number of comments (we’re receiving about 200 comments per day at the moment) and match all that in categories and do some other fancy processing… Because of all this, it’s far from being immediate.

On the machine it’s developed on, during the Linux Mint 9 RC, the Software Manager used to take a rough 10 seconds to start. Improvements were released with the version that came with Linux Mint 9, and the startup was reduced to a rough 5 seconds. Today we managed to further reduce that time to roughly 2 seconds.

Results on various machines:




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