Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

MeeGo Netbook Performance: It's Beating Ubuntu & Co

Filed under
Linux

The last time we ran a performance comparison of different Linux distributions on netbooks was in late November, but now we have a new set of Linux distributions out there, so we have carried out a new comparison. In particular, we are looking closely at how the MeeGo distribution -- is performing now that it has reached version 1.0. Also in the testing mix are Ubuntu Netbook Remix 10.04 LTS, Moblin 2.1, and Fedora 13.

The MeeGo operating system as a joint project between Intel and Nokia was announced back in February. An initial test release was made available in early April, but yesterday's MeeGo 1.0 release is the first where they are providing a stable netbook version. MeeGo 1.1 that is being targeted for release later this year will offer compatibility with touch-based devices like tablets and mobile Internet devices. An ARM variant is being worked on, but this initial netbook version is targeting Intel Atom processors, similar to the Moblin releases. MeeGo isn't just a standard Linux stack with a user-interface designed for small screens nor is it just a Qt-ified version of Moblin, but many changes have been going into this operating system, including the use of Btrfs by default and Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser.

Rest Here




More in Tux Machines

Openwashing

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

The Aquaris M10 is very much a first attempt for BQ and you would expect future iterations to have some significant improvements. It’s also hard to find compelling reasons why iOS or Android fans would want to switch over to an Ubuntu tablet, but those familiar with the operating system should be excited to finally have their needs met in the tablet market. One positive factor is that switching between tablet and desktop mode works very well for the most part, so can definitely fulfill professional needs as much as casual ones. This could be a viable option for someone who wants that flexibility and isn’t too fussed about some of the more superficial features. Read more