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Slackware Linux 13.1 arrives

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Slack

Yes, it's that time again! After many months of development and careful testing, we are proud to announce the release of Slackware version 13.1!

Slackware 13.1 brings many updates and enhancements, among which
you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available
today: Xfce 4.6.1, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and
easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 4.4.3, a recent stable release
of the new 4.4.x series of the award-winning KDE desktop environment.
We continue to make use of HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) and udev,
which allow the system administrator to grant use of various hardware
devices according to users' group membership so that they will be able
to use items such as USB flash sticks, USB cameras that appear like USB
storage, portable hard drives, CD and DVD media, MP3 players, and more,
all without requiring sudo, the mount or umount command. Just plug and
play. Properly set up, Slackware's desktop should be suitable for any
level of Linux experience. New to the desktop framework are ConsoleKit
and PolicyKit. ConsoleKit handles "seats", things like dealing with
devices when switching from one user to another. PolicyKit is a system
for fine-grained access control, allowing a non-root user to run certain
tasks with elevated privilege, but more securely than if the entire task
were simply run as root.

Slackware uses the 2.6.33.4 kernel bringing you advanced performance
features such as journaling filesystems, SCSI and ATA RAID volume
support, SATA support, Software RAID, LVM (the Logical Volume Manager),
and encrypted filesystems. Kernel support for X DRI (the Direct
Rendering Interface) brings high-speed hardware accelerated 3D graphics
to Linux.

There are two kinds of kernels in Slackware.




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