Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Church of Linux

Filed under

Linux, or Loonix as some of my layman friends like to call it has been around for years now and with the emergence of Ubuntu we’re starting to see greater uptake in the consumer arena that has been ruled for so long by Windows. Microsoft has even gone as far as mentioning Linux as a threat to it’s business. However, much like the Christian Church, the Church of Linux has seen many schisms. Often they are completely non-confrontational and are motivated by good reasons but with the vast number of Linux distributions (Distrowatch lists 312 variations) it’s difficult to choose which one to try.

For the new user, Ubuntu is an obvious choice, but do they really want Ubuntu or Kubuntu? Until they have tried both they won’t know which is better for them.

rest here

It doesn't seem like the blogger wants any comments

I don't whether he only approves comments in favour or if he just doesn't care if anyone uses the comment feature. Anyway, I post my comment here, not because it's important, but that it annoys me that I spent 5 minutes of my coffee break on this matter.

"If you use Distrowatch as a reference then your suggestion is already implemented. Check out the “Major Distributions” link, it will lead you to a selection of a few, each with a list of “Available editions” and “Alternatives” (in many cases spinoffs).

The rest of the argument is futile, and has been around for a long time. Basically you would need to kill the basic idea behind free software to achieve what you’re talking about. If all distributions are good at sending bug report upstream, the main development of software used will progress just as good.

The 312 distribution argument, changing only by current number, is totally out of context, except if you’re actually using embedded firewalls also as desktops, how that now would work. A lot of distributions are remasters to give better language support, and as such maybe also aimed at serving educational or other systems with well integrated operating system. Some are just personal projects made available to the public. Others are limited to work as jukeboxes or other multimedia boxes. Usually the massive number of distribution argument is used by supporters of proprietary software.

The biggest infrastructure to push Linux development ahead is anyway in the hands of a few big distributions, something that doesn’t change in either direction because of your “totalitarian” approach to free software. Just because you block some from using their freedom to fiddle with whatever they want, it won’t translate in 100 blocked developers equal to 100 more developers added to development of the chosen ones.

Linux is software made by users for users. Besides some crucial battles for user rights, which in a sense is a cross-platform concern, Linux evolves spontaneously. Is it really a good idea to out of sudden kill off spontaneity and expect all to join a corporate style of management?"

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

ZTE launches container networking solution for open source NFV

ZTE has unveiled an end-to-end container networking solution for open-source NFV, which it hopes will promote the development of cloud native technology and the open source ecosystem. The vendor says operators need the ability to quickly adapt to changing network demands with low cost solutions while maintaining continuous innovation. As such, it believes that containers are the best carrier for NFV transformation. ZTE says that container-based cloud native applications will become the trend for communications technology applications. However, the native Kubernetes network model used in the IT industry is too simple to meet telco service requirements. Read more

LuxMark OpenCL Performance On Windows vs. Linux With Radeon/NVIDIA

When carrying out this week's Windows vs. Linux gaming tests with AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce GPUs on the latest drivers, I also took the opportunity to run some fresh OpenCL benchmarks on Windows and Linux with the competing GPU vendors. I was particularly interested in running this test given the maturing state of ROCm on Linux for providing a new and modern compute stack... That coming with Linux 4.17+ will even begin to work from a mainline Linux kernel. Albeit for this round of testing was using AMD/GPUOpen's stock ROCm Ubuntu packages for 16.04 LTS as outlined on their GitHub page. Read more

Top Linux tools for writers

If you've read my article about how I switched to Linux, then you know that I’m a superuser. I also stated that I’m not an “expert” on anything. That’s still fair to say. But I have learned many helpful things over the last several years, and I'd like to pass these tips along to other new Linux users. Read more

i.MX6 ULL module runs Linux with real-time patch

Artila’s “M-X6ULL” COM runs Linux 4.14 with the PREEMPT_RT patch on an 800MHz i.MX6 ULL, and offers dual LAN controllers, 4GB eMMC or an optional microSD slot, and an optional carrier board. The M-X6ULL, which follows other Artila i.MX based modules such as the i.MX537 based M-5360A, measures only 68 x 43mm. Still, that’s hardly a record for modules featuring NXP’s Linux-driven, power-sipping i.MX6 ULL. MYIR’s MYC-Y6ULX measures 39 x 37mm. Read more