Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Church of Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux, or Loonix as some of my layman friends like to call it has been around for years now and with the emergence of Ubuntu we’re starting to see greater uptake in the consumer arena that has been ruled for so long by Windows. Microsoft has even gone as far as mentioning Linux as a threat to it’s business. However, much like the Christian Church, the Church of Linux has seen many schisms. Often they are completely non-confrontational and are motivated by good reasons but with the vast number of Linux distributions (Distrowatch lists 312 variations) it’s difficult to choose which one to try.

For the new user, Ubuntu is an obvious choice, but do they really want Ubuntu or Kubuntu? Until they have tried both they won’t know which is better for them.

rest here




It doesn't seem like the blogger wants any comments

I don't whether he only approves comments in favour or if he just doesn't care if anyone uses the comment feature. Anyway, I post my comment here, not because it's important, but that it annoys me that I spent 5 minutes of my coffee break on this matter.

"If you use Distrowatch as a reference then your suggestion is already implemented. Check out the “Major Distributions” link, it will lead you to a selection of a few, each with a list of “Available editions” and “Alternatives” (in many cases spinoffs).

The rest of the argument is futile, and has been around for a long time. Basically you would need to kill the basic idea behind free software to achieve what you’re talking about. If all distributions are good at sending bug report upstream, the main development of software used will progress just as good.

The 312 distribution argument, changing only by current number, is totally out of context, except if you’re actually using embedded firewalls also as desktops, how that now would work. A lot of distributions are remasters to give better language support, and as such maybe also aimed at serving educational or other systems with well integrated operating system. Some are just personal projects made available to the public. Others are limited to work as jukeboxes or other multimedia boxes. Usually the massive number of distribution argument is used by supporters of proprietary software.

The biggest infrastructure to push Linux development ahead is anyway in the hands of a few big distributions, something that doesn’t change in either direction because of your “totalitarian” approach to free software. Just because you block some from using their freedom to fiddle with whatever they want, it won’t translate in 100 blocked developers equal to 100 more developers added to development of the chosen ones.

Linux is software made by users for users. Besides some crucial battles for user rights, which in a sense is a cross-platform concern, Linux evolves spontaneously. Is it really a good idea to out of sudden kill off spontaneity and expect all to join a corporate style of management?"

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Debian GNU/Linux Running On Mobile Devices Like PocketCHIP, Samsung Galaxy, ZeroPhone, & Pyra

Debian is also called the universal operating system as it is used as a base for hundreds of Linux distributions. So, this claim also underlines that Debian should run on mobile devices too–right? Well, Debian developers are continuously working to add support for new devices and adapt it as per hardware and GUI capabilities of different devices. Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 5

Big update today and probably a very awaited one: here is an important step on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. Let’s get the new Ubuntu Dock installed by default! For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post. Read more

5 Best Vector Graphics Editors for Linux

Here's a list of the best vector graphics software for Linux that can be used as Adobe Illustrator alternative for Linux. Read more

Oracle changes heart on Java EE

  • Oracle opens up Java EE
    Oracle continues to make progress Java EE 8, the enterprise edition for the Java platform, and moving forward it would like to advance Java EE within a more open and collaborative community. Specifications are nearly complete and the Java team expects to deliver the Java EE 8 reference implementation this summer. As the delivery of Java EE 8 approaches, Oracle believes they have the ability to rethink how Java EE is developed in order to “make it more agile and responsive to changing industry and technology demands.”
  • Oracle considers moving Java EE to an open source foundation
    With the finalization of the Java EE 8 platform on the horizon, Oracle on Thursday said it's considering moving Java Enterprise Edition technologies to an open source foundation. The move, Oracle said in a blog post, "may be the right next step, in order to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing, and change the governance process."
  • Oracle doesn't want Java EE any more
    Oracle wants to end its leadership in the development of enterprise Java and is looking for an open source foundation to take on the role. The company said today that the upcoming Java EE (Enterprise Edition) 8 presents an opportunity to rethink how the platform is developed. Although development is done via open source with community participation, the current Oracle-led process is not seen agile, flexible, or open enough. ”We believe that moving Java EE technologies to an open source foundation may be the right next step, to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing and change the governance process,” Oracle said in a statement.