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How do you take screenshots with the menu showing?

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Hi. There's something I've been wondering about for some time now. I've been Googeling the subject a little, but I've failed to find an answer.
How do you take screenshots showing the menus in KDE, GNOME and Xfce? I keep seeing those cool screenshots showing off menus here on Tuxmachines and I'd like to make some like that myself.

Taking screenshots of menus

You can also use Imagemagick from the terminal. With Imagemagick (and a delay) you can even resize the screenshots while you are taking them.

further questions of screenshots

When I try to take a screenie with ksnapshot of mplayer while it is playing a clip or movie, the output only shows a blue screen. What do I need to do in order to make the frame in the movie show during the snapshot?

h

re: of screenshots

Try a different video output driver. I find that using xv allows for screenshots, even if it does "disable" fullscreen.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Thanks for the reply

Thanks for the reply and explanation srlinuxx. I'm gonna give it a try.

re: Howto take screenshots with the menu showing

It's all in the delay. Give yourself time to get 'em open where you want. In distros with ksnapshot (kde), it's a breeze, just set the snapshot delay for 6, 7, or 8 seconds - whatever you need.

In light distros without ksnapshot, it's still a matter of delaying. In those cases, if I am forced to use like scrot, then it has a switch to allow for it. For example, scrot -d 8 desktop.jpg

For those distros in which I must resort to xwd, I use sleep. Sleep is basically a delay mechanism for unix/linux. So, for example: sleep 6; xwd -root > desktop.jpg

(Of course with xwd, they aren't really saved as jpegs. I just use that extension for convenience later when I convert them to jpgs.)

hth,
-s

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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