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Best Newbie Linux Distro

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Linux

I'm been taking a look at some of the alternatives to Ubuntu, the Linux distribution I've been using for two and a half years now. Ubuntu tends to grab all of the attention, but how do some of the alternatives compare?

Debian was easy to install. It used to have a reputation for being difficult to install, but the new graphical installation interface was perhaps the easiest of all three to use. Debian is very strict about including only free and open source software, and the installation gave me an message about missing firmware. I made a note of the message, and in the end, all I had to do was enable Debian's non-free repository and install some firmware for my wireless card- not a big issue, but it could be tricky for new users, and no other distribution I tried was this strict, and installed the firmware without asking.

Debian is the distribution upon which Ubuntu is based, but its priority is more stability than latest features, and it is not targeted at new Linux users like Ubuntu. Using Debian reminded me of Ubuntu when I first started using it tree years ago- a lot of the packages are old.

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What a crock of poo. Go to

What a crock of poo. Go to the Ubuntu forums and see how many have problems with their brand new Ubuntu install.

Ubuntu is no different than any other distribution except it doesn't have a Control Center where a user can easily configure their system when things don't work.

Control Center

@poodles

What is the functional difference between a Control Center and menu entries System -> Administration and System -> Preferences?

Answer - none

From my experience Yast is the most unintuitive control center I have ever used.

KDE's System Settings is a good control center, you will find it in Kubuntu and other KDE based distros.

For Ubuntu (and Debian Gnome) the System menus are the control center.

Re: Control Center

There's simply nothing like Mandriva's control panel application and associated Drake tools. YaST is in the minor leagues... As far as Ubuntu's extensions to the KDE Control Center, if YaST is in the minor leagues, it would be a AAA player. Ubuntu's system is still in the knothole league. Everytime you ask a single question about a problem in Ubuntu in their forum, it's met with "open a terminal and type 'sudo...'". Newbie friendly my rear!

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