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Preferred Filesystem

2% (21 votes)
22% (289 votes)
59% (790 votes)
4% (55 votes)
2% (27 votes)
7% (91 votes)
2% (26 votes)
3% (43 votes)
Total votes: 1342

you missed btrfs ;)

I'm personally using ext4 on all my systems at the moment with the view to moving to btrfs when opensuse allows it as an install option (unless I missed it in the latest snapshots)...

The advantage of cached filesystems is a huge performance gain and should only be used on systems with a UPS.
(unless you manage to crash linux somehow, which does happen to me non infrequently but can always be traced back to known issues)

If you want speed you risk data loss, but if you want data security you lose speed.
Always has been and always will be.

Money appears to fix this problem i.e. setting up a RAID server, but there is always a compromise or sacrifice for the feature that is most demanded, although with a complex RAID array the compromise is only money which is great if you have that much of it Wink


Smart people use XFS, end of story. No next-next clicking into Ext4.

In 1998, my CAD workstaton was an SGI system running a 64 bit IRIX OS over XFS. It was used to model the parts of a complete car by a major motor corporation. And now, in 2010, people should settle with 32 bit Ext4!? Only if they don't know better.

ext4 purely for the speed of

ext4 purely for the speed of fsck.

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