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Preferred Filesystem

you missed btrfs ;)

I'm personally using ext4 on all my systems at the moment with the view to moving to btrfs when opensuse allows it as an install option (unless I missed it in the latest snapshots)...

The advantage of cached filesystems is a huge performance gain and should only be used on systems with a UPS.
(unless you manage to crash linux somehow, which does happen to me non infrequently but can always be traced back to known issues)

If you want speed you risk data loss, but if you want data security you lose speed.
Always has been and always will be.

Money appears to fix this problem i.e. setting up a RAID server, but there is always a compromise or sacrifice for the feature that is most demanded, although with a complex RAID array the compromise is only money which is great if you have that much of it Wink

Ext4

Smart people use XFS, end of story. No next-next clicking into Ext4.

In 1998, my CAD workstaton was an SGI system running a 64 bit IRIX OS over XFS. It was used to model the parts of a complete car by a major motor corporation. And now, in 2010, people should settle with 32 bit Ext4!? Only if they don't know better.

ext4 purely for the speed of

ext4 purely for the speed of fsck.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Leftovers: Software

  • Introducing Stremio, a More Complete and Powerful Popcorn Time Alternative
    Stremio is an application built with Electron that streams and plays movies, TV shows, Youtube channels, and TV channels, from torrents. Sounds familiar?
  • mt-st project new homepage
    A short public notice: mt-st project new homepage at https://github.com/iustin/mt-st. Feel free to forward your distribution-specific patches for upstream integration!
  • letsencrypt support in propellor
    I'm using the reference letsencrypt client. While I've seen complaints that it has a lot of dependencies and is too complicated, it seemed to only need to pull in a few packages, and use only a few megabytes of disk space, and it has fewer options than ls does. So seems fine. (Although it would be nice to have some alternatives packaged in Debian.)
  • New release: usbguard-0.4
    I’m not dead yet. And the project is still alive too. It’s been a while since the last release, so it’s time to do another. The biggest improvements were made to the rule language by introducing the rule conditions and to the CLI by introducing a new command, usbguard, for interacting with a running USBGuard daemon instance and for generating initial policies.
  • The Improvements To GNOME's Nautilus 3.20 FIle Manager
  • Nautilus 3.20 Will Be a Major Upgrade, Here's What's New
    A new GNOME major upgrade is on its way, and it will ship with Nautilus 3.20. One of the developers working on it has presented some of the major features that will land.

today's howtos