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Microsoft Acquires Linux

Filed under
Humor

The sale was concluded at the Redmond, Washington office of Chief Software Officer Bill Gates at 7:30pm to avoid causing a stock market panic.

Bill assures current Linux users that they can continue to use their products for an additional 30 day trial period, but after which, they will be required to activate their product via the web or telephone.

Linus will invest some of the cash into buying up the rest of the GNU-based software on the market., after he returns from his 3 week vacation in sunny Redmond.

Source.

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