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Mandriva Linux 2010 Spring Beta2 is available for tests

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We are now very near from final release. Here comes the second beta release for 2010 Spring version of Mandriva Linux. As usual you will be able to test it as it’s available on your favorite public mirror:

>> 32 and 64 bits DVD isos and mini dual iso (both 32 and 64 bits) for Free release (100% Open Source software)

>> live CDs One isos for KDE and GNOME environments (One isos will be available on monday)

Mandriva tools have also been updated and propose new functionnalities:

* data encryption: you want to protect your data. Encrypt your home directory or your system: it’s as easy as clic!

* parental control: many bug fixes, you can now control not only network access but also applications

* network profiles: add your network services in your network profiles.

* Mandriva Directory Server: this new release proposes new functionnalities to help you manage a LDAP directory (userquota module, massive users import, OpenSSH LDAP public keys management..)

More information on 2010 Spring:




Mandriva

They picked a bad week to announce their beta 2 release when everyone and their brother is going ga ga over Ubuntu 10.04.

Mandriva Spring

Everyone and their dog is going to repost that tripe about "buggy" Ubuntu so in a sense this is a good week to propose an alternative.

Anyway this Mandriva release looks quite interesting in term of features, and the errata page only contains trivial issues. They have some exciting stuff like accelerated video and Pulse Audio integration in KDE, the latter developed by themselves!

It is actually the only RPM distribution polished enough to be used as the main OS (I don't count PCLOS, polished the day of release only and with no 64 bit in 2010).

Some points

I agree that Mandriva is an innovative company, and always has been. I have much respect for them.

I don't agree about PCLinuxOS. They've had their share of problems, recently, but I think they're back out of the woods. In the past, PCLinuxOS has worked flawlessly on 5 different machines, going through 3 different versions and lots of updating.

As fare as 64 bit is concerned, I used 64 bit Mandriva and couldn't help but wonder if the quality of the 32 bit version wasn't much better. From forum discussions, it seemed that people who installed from the One release had much fewer problems that people that installed 64 bit.

64 bit

If they shudder at 64 bit, I would suggest to them that Linux users don't all only do "normal desktop" activities.

Well then..

It should prove for in interesting week for Mandriva. Oh I installed PCLOS and it runs like a SCALDED DOG!

That is expected

64 bit is slower than 32 bit in point and clicking around but beats the heck out of it when you do things like encode a video or apply a filter to a picture... at least that's what they say around the 'net, they also give you technical reasons so must be true Tongue

That said of course PCLOS has the Kolivas patches etc., no denying of it.

uh!?

How comes half of the message I was referring to just disappeared? It said something like "[32 bit PCLOS] is much faster than my 64 bit Mandriva", hence my point above.

Mandriva better get this one right...

When I was using the RC candidate of 2010, it worked perfectly on my machine. When I upgraded to the final, it all went wrong. There were bugs everywhere. Mandy did address these pretty quickly, but this needs to be avoided in this release. Typically, Spring releases are much better than Autumn releases, so I have high hopes. I switched back to PCLinuxOS with their 2010 release, but I've got plenty of room on this 1.5 TB drive for a Mandriva 2010 Spring install.

Mandriva, you said? C'mon.

Mandriva? Fully-updated Cooker:
http://beranger.org/post/561573749/

One bad experience?

So let me get this straight: You've never had a bad experience in Windows? One kernel panic and you hate the distro? You're kidding, right? I've installed Windows XP a few times and one wrong driver install and it's back to the beginning. Seriously, I used to make it a habit of doing a system restore point before every driver installation to make sure nothing went wrong. Windows 98 was very hit and miss. So, again, one kernel panic and you throw in the towel?

FWIW, I've had just about every distro I've ever tried, as well as Windows 98, 98SE, XP, and 7 RC give me problems with installation at some time or another. If you haven't had any problems with a certain OS, you haven't tried installing it on enough machines, or you simply haven't installed an OS on a machine before. Windows certainly isn't foolproof, neither is any Linux distro.

Mandriva Beta2 and PCLOS

On my trial desktop machine, I've been running Mandriva Cooker 64-bit (just snapshotted as Mandriva's 2010 Spring Beta 2).

Running PCLinuxOS 2010 on my Laptop.

PCLinuxOS 2010 reminds me of the old PCLOS with it's stunning stability and ease of use. Truly one of the leading distros for the newbie, as well as maintaining an extensive repository of packages for the more advanced user. Has also returned to good responsiveness to user community input.

Lots of daily updates still going on for Mandriva 2010 Spring, but it's shaping up very well, and I think it will be a winner.

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