Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Live CDs: All the Linux with None of the Commitment

Filed under

If you’ve been itching to try Linux but have been wary about partitioning your hard drive or otherwise afraid to commit the time and space to another operating system, the good news is you don’t have to risk anything to experience Linux. For quite some time, Linux distributions have been made available in live CD format, decompressing data on-the-fly and running entirely from memory. Not only can you try different flavors of Linux, but you can often use the live CD to install the software if you really like it.

And if that wasn’t enough, specialized live distros can run from business card-sized CDs, USB thumb drives, and some that are intended as rescue CDs for virus-ridden PCs. There are even live routers and firewalls in case you want to use an older PC as your main connection to the Internet. You can also just boot a Linux Live CD to try out the games,, or the GIMP image editor without installing them. Because and the GIMP are both available for Windows, it’s a great opportunity to see whether you like them before you install them on your Windows PC. And in the event your Windows installation goes bad, you can even use a Live CD to rescue or otherwise back up files from your hard drive.

There are plenty of reasons to try a Linux live CD. In addition to the above, it’s a great way to experience a different desktop environment...

Full Article.

I don't get it.

I use Live CD's as diag tools or to test various hardware for Linux compatibility, but actual use one as a desktop OS - no way!

I'm talking about running them on modern, pretty high-end systems (big cpu, fast cd/dvd, lots o ram) and of course they are all dog slow. Who in their right mind would use one as a real system? I think it turns people OFF from using Linux because the experience is so lame.

Do your non-Linux friends a favor, recommend (or help install it yourself) a dual-boot system NOT a slooooooooooooooooooooow Linux Live CD endurance lesson.

Re: I don't get it.

vonskippy wrote:

Who in their right mind would use one as a real system? I think it turns people OFF from using Linux because the experience is so lame.

Do your non-Linux friends a favor, recommend (or help install it yourself) a dual-boot system NOT a slooooooooooooooooooooow Linux Live CD endurance lesson.

I don't know, a lot of windows folks are quite intimidated by the whole partitioning and trying to install thing.

I've tested a couple that ran fairly okay from livecd. Of course they do much better loaded into ram. Perhaps if more of the livecds checked for how much ram is available and if enough, automagically loaded in toram it would make for better experiences.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: GNOME Software

  • GNOME Photos 3.18 App Gets Its First Hotfix Release Ahead of GNOME 3.18.1
    Earlier today, October 12, Debarshi Ray was happy to inform us all about the immediate availability of the first point release of his GNOME Photos 3.18 image viewer application for the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.18.1 desktop environment.
  • View your GTK3 app or VM on the Web
    Ever wondered how to view gedit in a browser? It’s not a secret anymore, broadway is there for some time.
  • The new search for GNOME Files (aka Nautilus)
    As some (most? none? who knows =P) of you already know, last cycle I worked as a Google Summer of Code intern with Gtk+ and Nautilus. We saw the very positive results of it. And the picky eyes out there noticed that I wrote with these exact words: “While the project is over, I won’t stop contributing to Nautilus. Even with the interesting code, even with all the strange things surrounding it. Nautilus is like an ugly puppy: it may hurt your eyes, yet you still warmly love it.”

Linux Devices

  • Linksys WRT1900ACS Router is Ready for Open Source Tinkering
    We still regard the Linksys WRT1900AC as one of the best and fastest routers available, though if you're eyeing that model, there's a new version available with more memory and a faster processor. It's the WRT1900ACS, which is essentially an improved version of the WRT1900AC. The new model boasts a 1.6GHz dual-core processor, an upgrade over its predecessor's 1.2GHz chip; 128MB of flash memory (same as before); 512MB of DDR3 RAM, which is two times as much as the WRT1900AC; and eSATA and USB ports.
  • Linux Foundation Takes on Real-Time Computing for Embedded Apps
    What's the next step for open source in the embedded computing market? Google (GOOG), the Linux Foundation and other inaugural supporters of the Real-Time Linux Collaborative Project, which launched this month with a focus on the robotics, telecom, manufacturing, aviation, medical and similar industries, think kernel-level real-time support is the answer.
  • Your Last Chance To Crowdfund InvizBox Go, A Portable Open Source VPN Router
    A small Irish tech startup is in the last few days of crowdfunding for a small Linux-based router it’s hoping to ship out to supporters in February 2016. If its Kickstarter campaign is successful, InvizBox Go will offer users some protection when connecting to WiFi networks. Whether you’re at home, at a hotel, or working out of a coffee shop, the InvizBox Go will be able to connect your devices and route all of your traffic over Tor or a VPN connection (or even both). And since it can connect all devices simultaneously, it’s a great solution for keeping your housemates secure without requiring them to plug into anything or even download any software. Or, let’s face it, it’s also good for watching blocked content from around the world. Users will also be able to block a known list of ad providers. An optional feature will block Windows 10’s tracking domain. Additionally, the device can acts as a WiFi extender or even be used to charge a mobile phone or tablet if users plug into its USB port.
  • Irish firm’s product to mask online activity

Leftovers: OSS

  • Industry Veterans Partner to Create a School for Software Engineers
    Another interesting angle is that during their first year at school all projects except their own, if they decide otherwise, must be open sourced online on the repository of their choice (such as GitHub). "Open source is a great option for teaching students because it not only helps you in building new skills as as software engineers, but also you know how to communicate with your peers. You have to understand how the team is working among many things. So I think open source is a great way to learn software engineering," added Barbier. Because the Linux Foundation also runs many specialized courses, I asked whether the school had any plans to collaborate with the Foundation. I was told that, although they are in touch with the Linux Foundation, it's too early to comment on it.
  • Eximbank opts for Allevo’s open source application FinTP
    It originates from Allevo’s older offering, qPayintegrator. The open source project has been in the making for a few years.
  • Volkswagen’s Diesel Fraud Makes Critic of Secret Code a Prophet
    A Columbia University law professor stood in a hotel lobby one morning and noticed a sign apologizing for an elevator that was out of order. It had dropped unexpectedly three stories a few days earlier. The professor, Eben Moglen, tried to imagine what the world would be like if elevators were not built so that people could inspect them.
  • Mozilla to Bar Many Legacy Plug-ins in Firefox By End of 2016
    As we've reported several times, Google has been introducing big changes in its Chrome browser, especially when it comes to how the browser handles extensions. If you've regularly used either or both of the most popular open source Internet browsers--Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--then you're probably familiar with the performance and security problems that some extensions for them have caused. Mozilla, like the Chrome team, is also focused on the effect that extensions have on performance and reliability. Now, Benjamin Smedberg, a Mozilla senior engineering manager, in a post to a blog, has confirmed that Mozilla will bar almost all plug-ins built using decades-old NPAPI technology by the end of 2016.
  • What you need to know about Astara
    Astara provides OpenStack operators with a vendor-agnostic network orchestration platform that addresses the complex nature and scale of Neutron implementations. Astara features a driver-based orchestrator to manage network functions from different providers on bare metal, in virtual machines (VMs) and containers.
  • Mirantis, NetApp announce joint partnership
    Mirantis, the pure-play OpenStack company, has joined hands with NetApp and announced a joint partnership that combines the Mirantis OpenStack with mission-critical NetApp storage infrastructures.
  • Mirantis and NetApp Partner for Joint Testing, Cloud Reference Architectures
  • Introducing the Astara project, a preview of Liberty and Mitaka, and more OpenStack news
  • Taunton and Somerset trust explores wider open source adoption
    Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust has commenced "exploratory work" around expanding its use of open source technology to include an e-prescribing solution after going live with a non-proprietary electronic patient record (EPR) system earlier this month. Trust IT director Malcolm Senior said that although work around potentially adopting a new e-prescribing system was at an early stage, Taunton and Somerset was now considering dates for possible implementation. Senior said he was confident the trust would be able to meet a timeline for completing development of an e-prescribing service in line with aims for a 'paperless NHS' by 2018.
  • Nexenta Brings Open Source-driven Software-Defined Storage Solutions to the Dell Solutions Roadshow 2015 in Japan
  • Update Python GNUPG library for GNU Health crypto plugin
    Issues digitally signing and/or verifying GNUHealth documents, using GNUPG version 2.x should be solved by upgrading to the latest python-gnupg library[1], version 0.3.8 . You can check the changelog[2] for the details.
  • Another city swaps in LibreOffice to replace Microsoft Office
    Another city has decided to swap out Microsoft Office for the open source LibreOffice productivity suite. As ZDNet reported, the municipality of Bari in Italy is currently installing the open-source office software on its 1,700 PCs after a successful trial involving 100 PCs.
  • ODS Onsite Training - Onsite Training to the European Commission
    The course aims at enhancing the understanding of linked open data principles and technologies. By the end of the course, participants should have a clear understanding of what linked open data is and how linked data technologies can be applied to improve the availability, understandability and usability of EU data.