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Gentoo on the NT kernel

Filed under
Gentoo
Humor

Why GeNToo?

Short answer: Gentoo is about choice.

Long answer:

A very frequent complaint in the open-source community is the Linux kernel's poor interactive performance and sometimes lackluster driver support. While the most common (and older) hardware is usually supported, the latest and greatest seldom is. In particular, laptops, printers and "gadgets" take a long time to receive proper, stable drivers, even from Linux-friendly vendors (c.f. ipw2100).

Also, the we have been receiving feedback from users who are upset about what they perceive as an embarrassing string of bad 2.6 kernel releases. They are fed up with show-stopping bugs in the virtual memory manager, real-time clock anomalies on suspend and other unfortunate "features".

If we allow ourselves to think out of the box, we will realize that the Microsoft NT kernel is an alternative to Linux, that is both proven and commercial-grade. It has support from nearly all hardware vendors in the world, and practically every PC comes with an license for the NT kernel. This means: the monetary cost of a copy of the NT kernel is close to non-existent for the average end-user.

So, let's use it!

Full Story.

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