Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gcal the ultra-powerful command line GNU calendar

Filed under
Software

Gcal can be used for a lot of calendar related questions. A zillion calendar options (did you wonder what the old armenic months are?), more than you probably know about. Of course, if you are not a calendar freak, this is not the main selling point. Gcal works (and is intended to) as a diary, and appointment planner. It can also be used to determine sunset or sunshine in your local coordinates, and if you are an amateur astronomer, it can give you the twilight times. The same holds for data for the Moon, it can give you the moon phase, for instance.

Hey, its already the 21st century! Command line? I can hear you mumbling How come I have to use a command-line calendar?'Of course, if you are into really pretty UIs... Skip this article. This is more for the Unix/Linux user who just pops open a terminal and shouts gcal -f $mycalendar when he wants to know what today is due.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

Quad-core media player runs Kodi/XBMC on OpenElec Linux

SolidRun’s tiny, $100 “CuBoxTV” media player runs OpenElec Linux and Kodi (formerly XBMC) on a quad-core i.MX6 SoC, and offers 100Mbps+ video decoding. The CuBoxTV is the first Freescale i.MX6 based media player to run the Kodi (formerly XBMC) multimedia distribution, says Israel-based SolidRun. CuBoxTV is closely based on the company’s latest i.MX6 based CuBox mini-PC, which now sells for $80 to $140, depending on the number of Cortex-A9 i.MX6 cores and other features. The CuBoxTV, which is available only with the quad-core i.MX6 SoC, goes for a sale price of $100. Read more

Canonical Is Still Considering Turning the Phone into a Mini-PC

Canonical is working to complete their idea of convergence with the launch of Ubuntu Touch, a new operating system for mobile devices. The desktop flavor of Ubuntu will eventually share the same code with the mobile one, and their plans go even further than that. Read more