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The main problem with Linux: ignorant users

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Last month, when the debate about the change in the position of window buttons in the next release of Ubuntu was at its height, I wrote a piece headlined "Ubuntu users, Shuttleworth doesn't owe you anything."
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It discussed, at length, one obnoxious aspect that is common to many GNU/Linux users - they have a sense of entitlement and feel they are doing a favour to the developers of any distribution they choose to use. The fact that they are benefitting by doing so does not appear to register.

Yesterday, I discovered one more GNU/Linux user who appears to think that Canonical does owe its users something - reliability - and is prepared to vent about it in public.

One would be inclined to expect better from Caitlyn Martin, who claims to have used GNU/Linux from 1998 onwards, and also advertises herself as a technical consultant with a background in several tech-related areas. But, sadly, such does not turn out to be the case.

Rest here

In response: Caitlyn Martin: This Takes The Cake: Sam Varghese of iTWire Goes On The Offensive Again

slinging shots

Both of them are being critical and slinging shots; neither is entirely innocent.

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