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10 Things Linux Does Better Than Windows

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Linux

In the computer hardware world, certain segments are saturated with choice, while others are not. Take graphics cards for example. For the most part, it's AMD (ATI) vs. NVIDIA. For CPU's, AMD vs. Intel. For CPU coolers... ugh, where to begin. We'd need at least a billion "vs." for that one! Then there are operating systems, where like GPU's and CPU's, the choices of major vendor are slim.

For consumers, there are three main operating systems on the market, with Microsoft's Windows dominating all of the others. In second place is Apple's Mac OS X, followed by all Linux variants combined. An OS seems simple, but in truth, it's the one piece of the computing puzzle that seems to divide us all. After all, there are few applications, games and drivers that are interoperable across each.

That being the case, I doubt many would refute the fact that some OSes do a better job at some things than others. Although Linux is easily the least-popular of the three consumer offerings on the market today, over my years of using the OS full-time, I've stumbled on many things that caused me to shout, "Why can't Windows do that?!", and this article pretty much sums up a handful of those.

1 - Partitioning

Long before I began to take Linux seriously, one thing that bothered me about Windows was the weak partitioner built into the OS. The biggest issue is its absolute lack of flexibility, and another is its lack of compatibility. Microsoft has done well to make sure that only a handful of file systems are supported for creation and even less for reading.

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