Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hands-on: Ubuntu One music store will rock in Lucid Lynx

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, has announced the official launch of the Ubuntu One music store. Integrated into the Rhythmbox music player in the upcoming Ubuntu 10.04 release, the store allows users to purchase downloadable songs and albums.

The music store is powered by 7digital, an online music distributor that offers over 4 million songs in the MP3 format without DRM. Canonical partnered with 7digital and developed the software that allows the music store to integrate with Rythmbox and Ubuntu One, the cloud service that Canonical launched last year.

The Ubuntu One music store is accessible through the navigation sidebar in Rhythmbox. When the user clicks on the Ubuntu One item in the sidebar, it will load the store interface in the main area of the Rhythmbox window. The store is basically a webpage that is loaded into an embedded WebKit frame. It's not fully integrated into the Rhythmbox track selection user interface like the Jamendo and Magnutune stores. The WebKit approach feels a bit less seamless, but it's arguably better because it allows a richer presentation. The music store interface shows a lot of album art and other visual elements.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Read more

AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API. Read more

Red Hat News

Peppermint 7 Released

Peppermint 7 launched a few days ago. Peppermint is a lightweight Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with an emphasis on speed and simplicity. Although the name is similar to Linux Mint, the projects aren't directly related. Peppermint originally was envisioned as a "spicier" alternative to Mint—whatever that means! Many distros come with a wide assortment of feature-rich applications, and that's great for power users who need those apps. But older machines can struggle to cope with those demanding distros. Peppermint solves the problem by offering a carefully curated suite of web apps that perform tasks traditionally handled by native apps. It's an approach that will be familiar to any Chromebook users reading this article. Read more